Via Francigena

posted 15 Jul 2015, 03:15 by Mark Ramsden   [ updated 15 Jul 2015, 05:59 ]

Canterbury to Rome 1200 miles


Look how the original pilgrims travelled – by horseback if they could afford it. Bev is doing the modern equivalent – travelling by open-topped car. However, not being too concerned about historical accuracy, the roof will be up if the weather dictates.

 

The Via Francigena was first mentioned in the 3rd century and is Europe's oldest route of pilgrimage. After leaving England, it winds through Arras and Reims (France) and Lausanne (Switzerland) before reaching Tuscany and some of Italy's most beautiful landscapes, before heading down to Rome, the eternal city.

The earliest map of the road was made in around 990 by Sigeric the Serious, the then Archbishop of Canterbury, who made the pilgrimage to Rome to receive his pallium (ecclesiastical vestments.)


https://sites.google.com/a/llandudnomethodists.org.uk/llandudno-methodists/bevs-pilgrimage-blog/viafrancigena/viaf-map.jpg

 

Start

End

Via

Distance (miles)

Comments

Canterbury

Calais

Dover

19

The original pilgrims did not have a tunnel, so the ferry is the right way to cross the Channel.

Calais

Arras

Wissant

77

Wissant, not Calais, was the old port for crossings from Britain to France.

Arras

Reims

 

118

 

Reims

Besancon

 

212

 

Besancon

Lausanne

 

84

 

Lausanne

The Great St Bernard Pass

 

78

 

 

Great St Bernard Pass

Vercelli

 

123

 

Vercelli

The Passo della Cisa

 

152

 

Passo della Cisa

Lucca

 

87

 

Lucca

Siena

 

75

 

Siena

Rome

 

159

 

 

We expect to have set off by 24th September, and for the journey down to take about 11 days, with plenty of stops to see the sights and drive beautiful routes.

 

 

Comments